Turning HR’s Requisition Intake Process into a Meaningful Conversation


 

Completing the requisition intake process prior to getting that first candidate in the door is often viewed as frustrating and cumbersome by both hiring managers and recruiters alike.  

If you’ve ever fielded a call from a hiring manager that says their recruiter doesn’t “get” what they want, you know exactly what I mean.

But it’s vitally important these professionals are on the same page—and work as trusted partners—to achieve the end goal of bringing in top talent. Studies like those done by Deloitte have long shown that recruiters and hiring managers that have a strong relationship and communicate well consistently outperform those that do not. 

This is where having an expert recruiting team and a defined requisition intake process can really pay off. Because knowing what questions to ask and what information to bring to the table can help both identify with clarity what makes the right talent for the role, and also give the recruiter the tools to engage in conversations with higher-caliber talent.

Share information beyond what’s requisition-related

The ideal intake process gives recruiters the information vital to conducting a great search. It helps them validate the requirements that the hiring manager has for the talent the recruiter will present. But beyond information that help recruiters nail down titles, certifications, likely associations and competitors for talent—the information you’d expect to discuss—top-notch recruiters will go much deeper to discover: 

  • Changes in the industry landscape. What are the industry challenges that might act as a roadblock to your talent acquisition success?
  • Your challenges and strategic goals. What is the business unit trying to achieve through talent, both long- and short-term? What talent will be required for you to be able to compete now, and in the future?
  • Success measures. What do employees in similar roles think is most fulfilling about their roles? And what characteristics of theirs would you like to “clone” in your search?

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You can tell when your recruiter is a great business partner: not only do they bring requisition-related research to the meeting—sharing what talent is available in the market, news about competitors, and companies that are not always top of mind as competitors—but they’re continually on the search for other information that can help you connect with top talent. So, they may come with additional requests. For example, they may ask to meet with successful employees in a similar role, or the names of industry leaders to follow…they’ll go out of their way to get information to ensure your strategy and message continually opens up channels to engage with talent in order to sell the opportunity.

How this information colors the candidate message

Engaging with top talent means more than answering questions about what this role entails, benefits or salary. It means being able to speak to the purpose of the role, how it fits into the future of the company and, quite often, what it means to the industry.

In a talent landscape in which candidates drive and expect engagement, it’s up to the recruiter to paint a picture of the opportunity and the company as the career destination of choice.

The time and effort the recruiter invests in understanding the unique challenges and competitive landscape is probably the most important tool in their portfolio for helping connect with candidates and helping to achieve your strategic workforce goals.

 

Written by Patty Silbert

President of Newton Talent since 2018, Patty Silbert has over 30 years of experience developing the innovative solutions that help HR professionals just like you meet their most pressing recruitment challenges and their companies achieve their talent acquisition goals. She is a regular writer and speaker on the subjects of recruitment strategy, employment branding, HR technology, and leadership.